Pedego Featured in The Wall Street Journal

The largest newspaper in the United States has just featured Pedego in a recent issue. Called “Instead of Slowing Down, He Revved Up With An E-Bike,” the article appears in the “What’s your Workout” section of The Wall Street Journal and details how 70-year-old Californian Bruce Austin switched to a Pedego Ridge Rider electric bike after he found it was too challenging to get up hills on his mountain bike and keep up with his kids.

The article by writer Jen Murphy appears in the August 7, 2017 issue and tells the story of how Bruce loved to ride the mountain bike trails near his home in Camarillo, especially with his two sons, who are now in their 40s but in recent years he had found the exercise was too hard. “My heart rate would be way out of range,” he’s quoted as saying. “After a three-hour ride I’d be wiped out.” So he purchased a Pedego electric bike with pedal assist and now keeps up no problem – he uses his pedal assist when he’s tackling a steep climb but otherwise turns it off when he’s on flat ground. The author writes, “Riding his e-bike has helped bridge a generation…allowing him to ride regularly with his sons, as well as his two daughters, both in their 20s.”

Bruce uses his e-bike’s battery-powered assistance to keep his heart rate in its appropriate range. Photo by Michal Czerwonka.

The article goes on to say, “Mr Austin bought a second e-bike so he can ride with his wife, Rhonda, his daughters, and friends his age. ‘In the past, my daughters found mountain biking stressful,’ he says. ‘Now they’ll be full-throttle on the e-bike and they have so much fun. They haven’t yet refused a ride.'”

The article finishes by addressing the myth that using an electric bike while working out is cheating. “Riding an e-bike is akin to doing push-ups on your knees or using a weight-assisted pull-up machine,” the author writes. She then quotes exercise physiologist Adam Mills as saying, “You’re still getting a workout. You just have a little help.” Adam goes on to say the because an electric bike is heavier than a normal bike, due to the weight of the battery and motor, it gives a better workout when not using power assist. “It requires a lot more core engagement, especially if you’re on mountain trails and making tight turns…E-bikes make the sport more accessible to a broader demographic.”

To read the article in its entirety, log on to the story on The Wall Street Journal‘s website.

Pedego Featured in Bicycle Retailer Magazine

Pedego Featured in Bicycle Retailer & Industry News Magazine

Pedego Featured in Bicycle Retailer Magazine

America’s de facto magazine about the bicycle retail industry has featured Pedego in its most recent issue. Called “100 on the way to 500,” the article describes the company as “the fastest growing, and least traditional, bike brand in the business.” Founder Don DiCostanzo is quoted heavily in the piece and he says “his goal is to build Pedego into the brand that consumers think of when they think of electric bikes – just like Amazon is top of mind for online shopping, Harley-Davidson for motorcycles, or Tesla for electric cars.”

The story by writer Doug McClellan appears in the July 2017 issue of Bicycle Retailer and Industry News (BRAIN) magazine and features Don as well as various dealers of Pedego electric bicycles including Mike and Rachel Wolf. The couple opened Pedego’s 100th retail store in the United States in Simsbury Connecticut and Mike, who started working in the bike business 65 years ago, says he’s never met anyone like Don because “he’s a promoter. If you go to the toilet you’ll see a Pedego sign up there.” Mike also says he’s impressed with “Pedego’s investment in replacement parts. DiCostanzo said Pedego maintains an inventory of more than $1 million in spare parts and stocks every component for every Pedego bike ever sold.”

“A car dealership is not the right place to buy an electric car and, similarly, a traditional bicycle store is not the place to buy an electric bicycle.”

The July issue of BRAIN also features a guest editorial written by Don DiCostanzo in which he explains how retailers can learn about electric bikes from the car industry. “Some car companies, including Ford and Mercedes Benz, have already launched electric bicycle models. BMW is launching its line of electric bicycles in the US right now, and General Motors is reportedly developing one. The reason is simple — they understand that car sales are flat because we simply don’t have room for any more vehicles in our cities. Other forms of mobility are emerging and they don’t want to be left behind.” Don goes on to say the a car dealership is not the right place to buy an electric car and, similarly, a traditional bicycle store is not the place to buy an electric bicycle. Which is why Pedego has come up with a successful retail model in which store owners are licensees, not franchise owners. That means they can stock their shelves with whatever accessories they want provided the electric bikes are purchased solely from Pedego.

Don goes on to say in the column that bicycle retailers can learn the following from the automotive industry: “Open a separate location; offer just one brand that specializes only in electric bicycles; and locate it away from other bicycle stores. Pick a brand that offers plenty of choices and that has powerful systems and extended range batteries.”

To read the articles and column in their entirety, click here and download the PDF: BRAIN-PEDEGO-July-2017

Own a Pedego Store

Want a New Career After 50? Open a Pedego Store

Own a Pedego Store

The beautiful showroom at the Pedego 30A store in Florida.

 

Bill Gordon is a middle-aged entrepreneur who lives in Portland, Oregon and who owns the popular blog website 50PlusNation. He recently came across the “How to Startup After 50” article in the latest issue of Inc. Magazine that featured Pedego store owners around the United States. He was skeptical at first but after reading the story he was intrigued: were baby boomers really finding fun by opening electric bicycle stores? He and his wife decided to visit Pedego Portland, twice, and now they’re seriously contemplating opening their own Pedego shop!

In his blog post called, “An Amazing Encore Career Option from Pedego. Check it Out!” Bill writes, “I was stunned when I realized that Pedego appears to be a franchise but is not. That is an incredible benefit. Most Pedego stores are independently owned by folks like those in the Inc. Magazine mug sheet photos, all of whom paid no fees to get started, just the costs of their inventory and the simple furnishing of an attractive multi-colored 1,000-2,000 sq ft retail space. The Pedego home office team assists in locating, outfitting, opening and even some of the major tasks of running the business with their range of dealer support services.”

Tommy Connell of Pedego Portland was a key influence in Bill Fordon believing in the company's excellent business model.

Tommy Connell of Pedego Portland was a key influence in Bill Fordon believing in the company’s excellent business model.

This is definitely a win and extends to those who want to open a Pedego store in Canada. There are no franchise fees and Mike Clyde, the owner of Pedego Canada, will personally assist you with the set-up process.

Bill then goes on to write, “My take away is that Pedego is truly set up to feel like a ‘business in a box’ for the committed entrepreneur, or in many cases the entrepreneurial couple. It clearly takes work. However, with a product that sells itself and also naturally becomes the focus of lots of socializing it doesn’t look like it could be overwhelming – as a store owner it looks like – “hello fun”, along with a new income stream.”

In other words, not only does it make financial sense to open a Pedego store in Canada, but it’s also fun! Pedego is the only electric bicycle company in North America to have such a devout following that a “Pedego Owners Group” was created!

To read Bill Gordon’s blog article in its entirety, click here: An Amazing Encore Career Option from Pedego. Check it Out!.

And should you wish to learn more about how to open a Pedego Store in Canada, visit our “Own a Store” page and then please contact Mike Clyde directly at info@pedegocanada.ca.

Inc. Magazine Features Pedego

 

inc-magazine-pedego-feature-spreadNorth America’s popular Inc. Magazine, the publication “for growing businesses” has featured Pedego in its most recent issue. Called “Life Cycles,” the article describes the company as “taking profitable advantage of two converging trends: aging customers looking for an easier bike ride and aging founders who want a second (or third or fourth) act.” Founders Don DiCostanzo and Terry Sherry (who are both in their 60s) might take exception to being called “aging founders,” however, as evidenced by the quote,”We don’t think of the dealers as old because we don’t think of ourselves as old.”

The story appears in the March 2017 issue of Inc. Magazine and features Don, Terry as well as various dealers and riders of Pedego electric bicycles. It talks about Pedego as “a $15 million company (and) the nation’s leading brand of electric bicycle, according to Navigant Research.” What’s more interesting, however, is the fact the “majority of those driving Pedego’s three-year 154 percent growth are retired or semi-retired people starting businesses for the first time.” The writer, Leigh Buchanan, then goes on to interview boomers who opened Pedego branded stores after trying out the electric bikes. Buchanan writes that many were “returning to two wheels for the first time in decades. The spirit was willing, the flesh, perhaps, not so much. Electric bikes acted as psychic training wheels.”

inc-magazine-feature-pedego

The article also describes a somewhat surprising stat that Terry and Don receive roughly 400 inquiries a year from people wanting to open Pedego branded stores after discovering the bikes by riding them. Beth Black was one such individual who opened her store in Seal Beach, California. She’s quoted in the article as saying, “You get on the bike for the fist time and twist that throttle and suddenly you’re yelling, ‘Woohoo!’ It’s like you’re recapturing something.”

To read the article in its entirety, click here and download the PDF: Inc.-Magazine-Pedego.

 

 

Entrepreneur Magazine Features Pedego

entrepreneur-magazine

North America’s popular magazine Entrepreneur has featured Pedego’s CEO in its most recent issue. Called “To Franchise or Not to Franchise: How to Decide,” the article describes Don DiCostanzo’s experience launching the Pedego company in California and then expanding it to become the number one selling electric bike brand in North America with dealerships across the U.S., Canada, Mexico and Europe.

The story appears in the December 2016 issue of Entrepreneur magazine and features Don as well as the CEO of Nekter juice bars, Steve Schulze, describing their two different approaches to brand expansion.  Steve kept to a franchise model while Don opened his first Pedego branded store in Huntington Beach in 2011 and then chose to license other Pedego stores so he “could focus solely on manufacturing and selling rather than having to expend energy supporting and growing a franchise,” the story reads. Every licensing deal Don arranges differs slightly but in each case an independent dealer setting up a Pedego store receives the rights to use the brand name and agrees to exclusively sell the electric bikes. “Though some licensors charge an annual licensing fee, Pedego does not.” the article continues. “The model worked. After four years, Pedego had dealers selling and renting bikes from California beach towns to Colorado ski towns to the East Coast – each store run by individuals who had researched the local market to appeal to specific communities, something a chain or a franchisee would struggle with.”

entrepreneur-magazine-pedego-2

In the article Don (pictured right) describes how his business model is different compared to Steve Schulze, the CEO of Nekter juice bars, who went with a franchise system.

The article, written by Jason Daley, also describes the benefits Don experienced from licensing the Pedego brand including never having to advertise to actively seek new dealers, because most of the dealers started out as customers. “We went from one store to 87 locations in about four years, and we think next year we’ll add another 50. And it’s all 100 percent organic,” Don is quoted as saying. He encourages his dealers to connect with customers over their mutual passion. “Sharing their life experience is part of the model,” says DiCostanzo. “That enthusiasm and entrepreneurial spirit is what drives us beyond any of our competitors.”

To read the article in its entirety, visit Entrepreneur.com.